The Empowerment Project
3 days ago
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We, as women, fight for our selves every day. We fight to be ourselves. Not to lose ourselves. We have to fight to tell the truth. Because what we aren’t supposed to do, as women, is tell the truth. We are supposed to be silent — to smile and look pretty. To feel fulfilled in unfulfilling lives. To be happy and cheery and perky at all times, emanating positivity like fucking TV moms and robot cheerleaders. We aren’t supposed to make anyone uncomfortable with things like feelings or reality. Our emotions and our vulnerability are used against us in the most hateful and violent ways. »Whining about boys in bars: On feminism and loving men (via feministcurrent)
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bodysexgender:

You know what is really gross…

I used to get sexually harassed and catcalled by men all the time when I was in school and college. Now I’m an adult, it rarely happens

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I’m not going to pat anyone on the back…I’m not going to enable them in the misguided notion that our experiences are identical—-because they’re not. Black women deserve spaces where we can be experts on ourselves, and we should protect them fiercely. And while we are protecting them, it does not mean that we are dismissing someone else’s experience. That doesn’t mean that we are silencing anybody else. But it does mean that we have to push people to think more critically about race and gender and sexuality…

My life and my body cannot be community property because my oppression is not community property…If you are privileged and entering a space for the marginalized, you should do so with the intention to use some of that empathetic energy to dismantle oppression…

Respect the space.

»Kimberlyn Foster (x), founder of For Harriet,  (via katrinapavela)
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fluffymb:

The moment when the table turns.

(Source: baahts)

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FEMINIST FRIDAYKirsten Gillibrand (Born December 9, 1966)WHO: American politician and Junior State Senator from New York since 2009.WHAT: Although previously seen as a conservative Democrat during her time in the House, Gillibrand’s initiatives in the senate, such as fully supporting the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” have been seen as populist-leaning liberal. Political affiliations aside, Gillibrand’s most kick-ass moment is turning the focus on her so-to-speak cat-callers—yes, at work—in her new book “Off the Sidelines.” In it, she reveals male colleagues’ comments on her physical appearance, weight loss, and even unwanted touching. But this doesn’t deter her—she’s said this sexism only fuels her a more aggressive desire to stop military and college campus sexual assault. (via TIME).FAVE QUOTE: “If I can work an issue like sexual assault on college campuses and drive a national narrative and know I’m making a difference, then whether or not we pass another bill in Congress, there’s still good things I can do.”

FEMINIST FRIDAY

Kirsten Gillibrand (Born December 9, 1966)

WHO: American politician and Junior State Senator from New York since 2009.

WHAT: Although previously seen as a conservative Democrat during her time in the House, Gillibrand’s initiatives in the senate, such as fully supporting the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” have been seen as populist-leaning liberal. Political affiliations aside, Gillibrand’s most kick-ass moment is turning the focus on her so-to-speak cat-callers—yes, at work—in her new book “Off the Sidelines.” In it, she reveals male colleagues’ comments on her physical appearance, weight loss, and even unwanted touching. But this doesn’t deter her—she’s said this sexism only fuels her a more aggressive desire to stop military and college campus sexual assault. (via TIME).

FAVE QUOTE: “If I can work an issue like sexual assault on college campuses and drive a national narrative and know I’m making a difference, then whether or not we pass another bill in Congress, there’s still good things I can do.”

3 weeks ago
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FEMINIST FRIDAY
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Born September 15, 1977)
Who: Nigerian writer and self-proclaimed storyteller

What: Adichie has written poems, short stories, plays, and novels for which she has won several awards, including the MTV Africa Music Awards 2014 Personality of the Year and and the honor of being in The New Yorker’s “20 under 40” Fiction Issue. Perhaps most notably, Beyonce sampled Adichie’s 2012 TED talk “We Should All Be Feminists” for her song “Flawless,” bringing the term and its definition to the attention of young audiences.
Fave quote: ”I think of myself as a storyteller, but I would not mind at all if someone were to think of me as a feminist writer… I’m very feminist in the way I look at the world, and that worldview must somehow be part of my work.”

FEMINIST FRIDAY

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Born September 15, 1977)

Who: Nigerian writer and self-proclaimed storyteller

What: Adichie has written poems, short stories, plays, and novels for which she has won several awards, including the MTV Africa Music Awards 2014 Personality of the Year and and the honor of being in The New Yorker’s “20 under 40” Fiction Issue. Perhaps most notably, Beyonce sampled Adichie’s 2012 TED talk “We Should All Be Feminists” for her song “Flawless,” bringing the term and its definition to the attention of young audiences.

Fave quote: ”I think of myself as a storyteller, but I would not mind at all if someone were to think of me as a feminist writer… I’m very feminist in the way I look at the world, and that worldview must somehow be part of my work.”

3 weeks ago
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pridefulvanity:

next time someone tells you Muslim countries oppress women, let them know Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Turkey, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, and Senegal have all had female Presidents or Prime Ministers and 1/3rd of Egypt’s parliament is female but the US has yet to even have a female vice president and can’t say “vagina” when discussing female reproductive rights

(Source: la-rinascente)

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lacigreen:

queeravenger:

wobbuffette:

cracked-dot-com-official:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

guyfitblr:

And finally someone said it

nobody’s fucking stopping you from putting on some foundation dude you can put it on and it’s discrete and other straight guys won’t be able to tell and it does wonders. nobody’s stopping you from moisturizing or even putting on the lightest bits of concealer. don’t worry, other straight men can’t tell

Also there’s less pressure for men to be attractive and more pressure on women to see past men’s looks for their personalities, like look how many movies star average/ugly dudes who still score modelesque girls.

step 1: create unrealistic, unattainable standards of beauty for women

step 2: build a multi-billion dollar beauty industry to sell women makeup, tell them they are worthless without it

step 3: mock and vilify women who wear makeup as vain and fake, mock and vilify women who don’t wear makeup as ugly

step 4: code makeup as exclusively feminine, make the feminine shameful, shame any and all men perceived as feminine

step 5: complain that you can’t wear makeup

all that commentary

(Source: officialmoviegoer)

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3 weeks ago
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White women and Black men have it both ways. They can act as oppressor or be oppressed. Black men may be victimized by racism, but sexism allows them to act as exploiters and oppressors of women. White women may be victimized by sexism, but racism enabled them to act as exploiters and oppressors of Black people. Both groups have led liberation movements that favor their interests and support the continued oppression of other groups. Black male sexism has undermined struggles to eradicate racism just as white female racism undermines feminist struggle. As long as these two groups or any group defines liberation as gaining social equality with ruling class White men, they have a vested interest in the continued exploitation and oppression of others. »

bell hooks

Quote from Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center. This is what is meant by the notion that oppression is not linear. As a Black woman, I can experience oppression by BOTH of their hands and via White men, not only White men. Something else I notice is that while White women are ALWAYS viewed as oppressed and never oppressors, they simultaneously write off Black men as only capable of oppression, when in fact White women, via Whiteness, can oppress Black men. Most of all, because of these dual statuses, both White women and Black men seem to approach Black women as stepping stools to get to White men’s power and as people without our own political needs, thereby existing solely as “support” structures in “their” causes to choose one of “their” sides, versus all of us recognizing differences in oppression with different needs to dismantle it, but all wanting imperialist White supremacist capitalist cisheteropatriarchy gone. *sigh*

(via gradientlair)

(Source: sweetpotatopig)

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